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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Boris Johnson wastes public money on vanity photos

The PM was accused of splurging public cash on “vanity” photographers when the Mirror revealed he had three working at No10. The third was hired in February 2021 on a salary of up to £60,635 a year. Their output included promo shots of the PM’s dog frolicking in the snow – while access for independent press photographers was restricted.

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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Conservatives create job shortages by limiting immigration

New rules since 1 January 2021 mean all immigrants must earn over £20,480, have a job offer and speak good English to get permission to work in the UK. After months of warnings this would lead to job shortages, ministers belatedly brought in carve-outs for truck drivers and care home workers. They are now looking at the idea of robot fruit-pickers.

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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Tories cancel Christmas

Boris Johnson unveiled a plan that would let ‘Christmas bubbles’ of three families meet for up to five days in 2020. But he rowed back as Covid rates rocketed, and weeks later plunged England back into full lockdown. It later emerged Mr Johnson and then-fiancee Carrie had a friend to stay over Christmas. They insist she was part of a childcare bubble.

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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Priti Patel found to have bullied Home Office staff

Standards advisor Sir Alex Allan quit in protest. He had ruled Home Secretary Priti Patel ’s conduct “amounted to behaviour that can be described as bullying”. But Boris Johnson had the final decision and overruled him, deciding Ms Patel had not breached the Ministerial Code. New ethics tsar Lord Geidt has asked for more powers to avoid such a situation again, but so far they have not been forthcoming.

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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Tories vote to deny poorer families school meal vouchers

Ministers refused to issue £15-a-week school meal vouchers over the first summer of Covid, instead pledging a £63m pot for the worst-hit, but U-turned when pressured by footballer Marcus Rashford. The vouchers were later dropped in favour of a scheme which critics say won’t reach everyone in need.

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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Tory U-turn on exam grades

Ministers performed a U-turn over exam grades in 2020. Pupils relied on teacher assessed grades due to Covid but a bungled algorithm downgraded 39% of A-Level results – 25,000 of them by two or more grades. After days of anger, the government said pupils could keep teacher estimates but it was too late for many who missed out on uni places.

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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Let the bodies pile high

Scientists called for a circuit-breaker lockdown in September 2020, but the PM resisted the idea at first amid fears about the economic impact. He eventually caved and imposed a month-long lockdown, allegedly fuming that he would rather “let the bodies pile high” than do it again. More than 50,000 people died in the second wave.

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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Tories cut foriegn aid, breaking manifesto pledge

Boris Johnson abandoned a 2019 manifesto vow by cutting billions in foreign aid, from 0.7% to 0.5% of national income. The decision, which prompted fury including from many Tories, was blamed on Covid but later extended, with Chancellor Rishi Sunak saying spending would only return to normal by 2024/25.

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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Boris Johnson wins election on a lie

Boris Johnson won the 2019 election on a pledge to “get Brexit done”. His deal passed the Commons in days and the UK severed its ties with Brussels in January 2020. But the UK then spent most of 2021 trying to unpick parts of the deal and threatening to tear up a key part relating to Northern Ireland trade. It’s still unresolved. Checks on UK imports from the EU have been delayed three times and ministers are considering a fourth.

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Lies, Scams and Criminality

Government unlawfully prorogues parliament

The Supreme Court ruled the PM acted unlawfully by proroguing Parliament in 2019. 11 justices said shutting down the Commons for five weeks before the Brexit deadline had an “extreme” effect on democracy. Supreme Court President Lady Hale said: “Parliament has not been prorogued.” The PM later announced a crackdown on the ability to challenge his decisions in the courts.